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July 14, 2004 : Cutting Out the Transom and Trimming the Motor Well - since my last entry I installed the motorwell bulkheads by putting fillets on the interior side of the bulkheads (not shown).

This boat is designed to have a slot in the transom and a motor mount/well inside the hull.  The purpose of the slot is to allow the outboard motor to tilt up when the boat is not being used.  The advantage of this configuration is that  two small compartments are created for portable gas tanks.  The whole affair is covered with a hinged top and keeps the decks cleared for chairs, etc.

I had originally planned to cut out the transom slot after rolling the boat over.  After considerable thought I realized that this job should really be done before flipping the hull.

Before cutting out the transom I did a little housekeeping and trimmed the rail and some of the planking off the back of the transom. Next I got my trusty saber saw and started cutting out the slot in the transom to open up the motor well.
After cutting into the transom a short way I used my Japanese pull saw to extend the cut on both sides of where the transom slot will be cut. Next I used my saber saw to cut across the back of the inside of the motor well.

Next I finished cutting the outside of the transom and removed the transom slot.

I used my Japanese pull saw to finish rough cutting the inside of the motor well.

This is the partially completed motor well.

 

This is the motor well after I  finished recutting, sanding/grinding the sides.

Here is a cross section of the back of the transom.  I'm showing this for two reasons.  First, you can get an idea of what a stitch and glue seam looks like, and second, please notice the gap in the epoxy where the two pieces of wood meet.  This gap is difficult to avoid if the epoxy paste is mixed to the correct consistency but will not cause a problem with the integrity of the hull.  When the outside of the hull is faired, the wood will be cut away down to the gap, and the gap will be filled with epoxy.  Imagine a line running parallel to the inside curvature of the epoxy fillet on the outside of the hull.  Also, the epoxy fillet will be covered with three layers of fiberglass tape and the outside of the hull will also have a good layer of fiberglass cloth.  The joint is extremely strong now, and it'll be even stronger when we get finished!

More to follow.

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