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Fairing the hull - I've only built one other stitch and glue, and it's easy to forget how important it is to get the planks at the chine to match exactly.  Having said that, when you have to torture 3/8 inch plywood into shape, it's almost impossible to not have an area where the chine planks are off by at least 1/8th of an inch.  The chine line is the one angle on the boat where the curve has to be both fair and straight - any deviation and the eye will pick it right up.  There are two ways to correct mismatching planks.  The first is to use the indented plank as a guide and to plane or grind away the access wood from the high side.  The disadvantage there is that in order to make the hull fair you will have to take off at least one ply on the high side of the chine.  If the plywood is 3-ply thick, you've just decreased the strength of the joint by 1/3 at precisely the place that it is needed!  The second way, and in my opinion the best way, is to use the higher of the two planks as the correct chine line.  The problem is then corrected by filling in the area created by the lower chine.

This admittedly is not a great photo, but hopefully you can see that the top side of the chine is low.

The first step in correcting the chine line was to sand the area to be filled.

Next I applied a thin layer of  thickened epoxy to the upper side of the joint and screeded it off with a 1 1/2 inch strip of luan plywood.

The other side has a similar situation, and I'll attack that during the next session.

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