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Fitting the keel to the hull:  The keel was heavy enough so that I couldn't hold it against the hull and mark it on my own.  I gave Roger a call and he, as usual, was willing to give me a hand.

First, Roger held the keel against the hull.  Using a compass I measured the largest gap, and marked a line on the keel by running the compass up the leading edge of the bow. Next we cut the newly marked line on the keel with a saber saw.  (Besides holding the keel, Roger reminded me that cutting is easier if  the deck screws used during gluing are removed before making the cut.)

When we finished the first cut the fit was close, but not perfect.  We re-marked the gap with a compass and re-cut the keel.  The result was the same.  At this point we realized that we were starting to chase the gap.  If we kept up the same process we would probably have cut the keel down to nothing.  Instead we used a piece of luan plywood to make a template (not shown).  The plywood was easier to cut and the process went a little more quickly.  We used a pencil to mark high spots on the template, and nibbled them off with a saber saw and sander.  After about an hour the keel gradually started to fit.

One of the things that helped in the final fit was to drill a hole in the bow and run a deck screw into the keel from the inside of the hull. After the inside of the keel was fitted to the hull we marked the outside of the keel and cut and sanded it to shape.

The final fit.

Addendum:  This is my last entry for several months.  On May 26, I had my prostate gland removed and will be on light duty for at least 6 weeks.  Thanks to everyone who has sent me emails and best wishes.

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