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Fabricating the Last Keel Piece:  This step of the process was one of those one hour jobs that winds up taking at least three hours!  We probably had the keel pieces on and off the boat at least a dozen times.

We started by making a cardboard pattern of the last keel segment scarf to use to match today's keel segment. The shape of the last keel scarf is transferred to the new keel segment.
Cutting out the scarf. Roger keeps the keel level while I sand.
The first fit of the keel segments. Here I propped the keel up and used a compass to trace the hull shape onto the new segment.

 

Cutting out the hull shape on the new keel segment. First fit of the entire keel piece.
Roger marks the keel scarf for the second cut.

 

After cutting the keel to the correct length, we used a flexible piece of wire to mark the trailing edge of the keel.

 

The keel in place with the trailing edge cut. We used a chalk line to mark a line for the bottom of the keel.
Cutting the bottom of the keel. Final sanding of the last two segments of the keel.
   

The final keel in place.

This may have been the most difficult (and fun) step of the process.  When making all of the cuts I took the advice of Tom Hill, my Wooden Boat School instructor, (and author of Ultra Light Boatbuilding) to "leave the line".  In fact, on most of the cuts I left the line plus 1/8 of a inch.  The reason for this is that even with the best saber saw, if too much pressure is applied during the cut the edge will not be square.  By leaving a little bit of wood I was able to square the cut with my sanders.

My next step will be to glue and screw down the keel segments.

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